Choctaw | History, Culture & Language (2024)

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Choctaw Indian encampment

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Choctaw, North American Indian tribe of Muskogean linguistic stock that traditionally lived in what is now southeastern Mississippi. The Choctaw dialect is very similar to that of the Chickasaw, and there is evidence that they are a branch of the latter tribe.

In the mid-18th century, there were 20,000 Choctaw living in 60 or 70 settlements along the Pearl, Chickasawhay, and Pascagoula rivers. Their dwellings were thatched-roof cabins of logs or bark plastered over with mud. Among the southeastern agriculturalists the Choctaw were perhaps the most skillful farmers, producing surplus crops to sell and trade. They planted corn (maize), beans, and pumpkins; fished; gathered nuts and wild fruits; and hunted deer and bear. Their most important community ritual was the Busk, or Green Corn, festival, a first-fruits and new-fire rite celebrated at midsummer. A notable funerary custom involved the ritual removal of the bones of the deceased from the body; subsequently, the bones were placed in an ossuary. This ritual was performed by spiritually powerful men and women known as bone-gatherers or bone-pickers, with the departed’s family members in attendance. Bone-gatherers were notable for their distinctive tattooing and long fingernails.

In the power struggles that took place after colonization, the Choctaw were generally allied with the French against the English, the Chickasaw, and other Native American tribes. After the French defeat in the French and Indian War (1754–63), some Choctaw land was ceded to the United States and some tribal members began moving west across the Mississippi. In the 19th century the growth of the European market for cotton increased the pressure for the acquisition of Choctaw land, and in 1820 they ceded 5,000,000 acres in west central Mississippi to the United States. In the 1830s the Choctaw were forced to move to what is now Oklahoma, as were the other members of the Five Civilized Tribes—the Creek, Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Seminole. For three-quarters of a century each tribe had a communal land allotment and a quasi-autonomous government modelled on that of the United States. In preparation for Oklahoma statehood (1907), some of this land was allotted to individuals from the Five Civilized Tribes; the rest was opened up to white homesteaders, held in trust by the federal government, or allotted to freed slaves. Tribal governments were effectively dissolved in 1906 but have continued to exist in a limited form. Choctaw descendants numbered more than 159,000 in the early 21st century.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Melissa Albert.

Choctaw | History, Culture & Language (2024)

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